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In Brief


Next Service:

19th June at 9:30 am.

Holy Communion
(Midweek Holy Communion)


The next village event will be Mothers Union meeting on 26th June 2019 at 2:30 PM in Landkey village hall


Diocesan Magazine

Click here to visit the Exeter Diocese website

A link to the magazine is available on the Home page.


Safeguarding

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Diocese of Exeter Safeguarding contacts


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Birthday blessings form part of our monthly Family Services and are appreciated by those whose birthday falls within the month when the service is held. Several people came forward for a blessing at our service on 2nd June, as shown in this photo. Image courtesy of Charles Waldron 3rd June 2019.
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Our Easter Sunday service was a joyful occasion and coincided with the 16th birthday of George Wilks, pictured on the right. He is accompanied by Angela Bellamy, who made Easter-themed cakes, as well as Angela's niece, Lottie. Image courtesy of Charles Waldron 21st April 2019.
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In Brief


Next Service:

19th June at 9:30 am.

Holy Communion
(Midweek Holy Communion)


The next village event will be Mothers Union meeting on 26th June 2019 at 2:30 PM in Landkey village hall


Diocesan Magazine

Click here to visit the Exeter Diocese website

A link to the magazine is available on the Home page.


Safeguarding

View our Safeguarding policy

Diocese of Exeter Safeguarding contacts


Recent Images Highslide JS
Birthday blessings form part of our monthly Family Services and are appreciated by those whose birthday falls within the month when the service is held. Several people came forward for a blessing at our service on 2nd June, as shown in this photo. Image courtesy of Charles Waldron 3rd June 2019.
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Our Easter Sunday service was a joyful occasion and coincided with the 16th birthday of George Wilks, pictured on the right. He is accompanied by Angela Bellamy, who made Easter-themed cakes, as well as Angela's niece, Lottie. Image courtesy of Charles Waldron 21st April 2019.
More Images
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Church History

Saint Kea established the first church in Landkey as long ago as the fifth century AD. The present-day structure stands on the site of the original building and contains some fascinating features, including three rare stone effigies.

Saint Kea's First Church

St Kea was a Celtic monk who spent a part of his life in the great abbey at Glastonbury. While there, he evidently felt called to proclaim the Christian Gospel and eventually gave up his sedentary lifestyle in order to embark upon a period of missionary travelling. Recent research has revealed that St Kea was present in the area that we now know as Landkey sometime between 450 and 490 AD.

The enclosure within which the church was built was referred to as a "lan" in the Celtic language of the time and it is from this ancient site, or "lan-de-Kea" that Landkey derives its name

After establishing his church in Landkey, St Kea went on to found other churches in Cornwall and north western France. He died in Cleder in Brittany in 495 AD.

The Present-Day Church

The present-day church stands within St Kea's ancient enclosure. The banks surrounding the churchyard provide the only clue to the existence of the original church as the first structure would have long since been lost to the ravages of time.

It is known that second church was built on the same site several centuries after the first. The evidence for this comes from a mention of a church in Landkey in the foundation documents of the Deanery of Exeter in 1225. None of that building survives apart from the font and three stone effigies, of which more follows later.

A third church was erected, again on the same site, sometime in the second half of the fifteenth century. It is that that building which stands to this day. The chancel was restructured in 1870 but, apart from that, the church has remained largely unaltered since it was built.

The Beaupel Effigies

At some time during the lifetime of the second church, the Manor of Landkey was occupied by a Sir Robert Beaupel. Sir Robert and his wife, Dame Elizabeth, are thought to have been buried within this church and were commemorated with beautifully carved effigies on their tombs (see pictures below). Sir Robert appears to wear the armour and chain mail of a crusader knight, while Dame Elizabeth's effigy is carved as though draped in a lovely ankle-length dress.

These effigies are very rare with the only other known example of a similar style being located in an Oxfordshire church. The effigies are mentioned in the Exeter Deanery documents (referred to earlier), dated 1225AD.

A third effigy, believed to be that of Lady Joan Beaupel, the daughter-in-law of Sir Robert, was also discovered in the niche of the north wall of the church relatively recently. It was in a poor condition but, thanks to a fund-raising effort in 2009, has now been restored.

If you would like to discover more about the history of St Paul's, you may like to visit the "Explore North Devon" website. This site contains contributions on local history from many communities in North Devon and the Landkey section includes photographs dating back to the late 1900s. A link to this site is included on our "Useful Links" page.

Please feel free to browse through our collection of pictures below. By clicking on each one, you will be able to view an enlarged image.

Images of the Beaupel Effigies

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Effigies of Sir Robert and Dame Elizabeth Beaupel.
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Effigy of Lady Joan Beaupel.

Our Church in Pictures - New and Old

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A modern picture of St Paul's, viewed from the south.
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This tranquil scene, which is reminiscent of the modern-day image, was probably taken around 1900.
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A recent view of the nave.
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The nave in the mid 20th century.
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St Paul's Church viewed from along the front of the nearby Ring O'Bells pub.
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The same view, possibly at the beginning of the 20th century.
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St Paul's, viewed recently from the west.
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The same view in the early 1900s.